Introduction Sentence Essay Examples

Introductory Sentence Essay Help introductory sentence essay help Introduction Types

Understand the purpose of a thesis statement. A thesis statement appears at the end of the introductory paragraph. It is a specific, one-sentence summary of the topic for your paper and your point of view about that topic. The body of your paper will work to support the thesis statement. This sentence creates a focus for your paper, so that you do not add any unnecessary information. Also, the thesis offers the reader concise information on the point of view of the complete essay.

Understand the purpose of a thesis statement. A thesis statement appears at the end of the introductory paragraph. It is a specific, one-sentence summary of the topic for your paper and your point of view about that topic. The body of your paper will work to support the thesis statement. This sentence creates a focus for your paper, so that you do not add any unnecessary information. Also, the thesis offers the reader concise information on the point of view of the complete essay.

Don't Start Your Essay with a Summary. If you summarize, the admissions officer does not need to read the rest of your essay. You want to start your essay with something that makes the reader want to read until the very end. Once you have drawn the reader in through the first one to three sentences, the last sentence in your introductory paragraph should explain clearly and briefly what the point of the whole essay is. That is, why you are using this person, place, or thing. What does it say about you?

First Sentence Of An Essay first sentence of an essay Writing Introductions ..

Print out the to task 2. Then circle the sentences which cover each of the four parts of argumentative essay introductions and write the number for each part in the margin next to it, just as you did for the introduction to the marine parks essay in

college essay introduction sentence

The introduction is the most important part of your essay, and its one purpose above all others is to draw in the reader. Ideally, your introduction should grab the reader's attention right from the first sentence. If the introduction can proceed to orient the reader to the focus of the essay, that can be very helpful. But orientation is not an essential purpose because that can be achieved gradually throughout the course of the essay.

introduction sentence for a compare and contrast essay

10.08.2017 · For an introduction to writing the first sentence of an essay, see "The First Sentence" under Academic Essays

An essay's introductory sentence is also called a hook. This sentence needs to intrigue readers enough to keep reading. While you are grabbing the reader's attention, the opening sentence also needs to be related to your persuasive essay's thesis statement. An effective opening sentence also provides a sense of context that the rest of your introductory paragraph will build on. It is often easier to write this sentence after you have drafted the rest of your essay.

Write a Great First Sentence - ThoughtCo

An essay's introductory sentence is also called a hook. This sentence needs to intrigue readers enough to keep reading. While you are grabbing the reader's attention, the opening sentence also needs to be related to your persuasive essay's thesis statement. An effective opening sentence also provides a sense of context that the rest of your introductory paragraph will build on. It is often easier to write this sentence after you have drafted the rest of your essay.


Says: This is a very effective introduction to an essay about your personality. Mentioning pride is a good way to indicate how important your beliefs and values are to you. In a sentence like this, however, it would be better to use "Throughout" rather than "Through." "Throughout" better expresses the widespread, expansive tone you want to give this sentence.You will probably refer back to your assignment extensively as you prepare your complete essay, and the prompt itself can also give you some clues about how to approach the introduction. Notice that it starts with a broad statement and then narrows to focus on specific questions from the book. One strategy might be to use a similar model in your own introduction—start off with a big picture sentence or two and then focus in on the details of your argument about Douglass. Of course, a different approach could also be very successful, but looking at the way the professor set up the question can sometimes give you some ideas for how you might answer it. (See our handout on for additional information on the hidden clues in assignments.)The introduction is the first sentence of your essay and it plays the dual role of setting the theme of your essay and engaging the reader. The introduction should not be overly formal. You do not want an admissions officer to start reading your essay and think, "here we go again." Although admissions officers will try to give the entire essay a fair reading, they are only human -- if you lose them after the first sentence, the rest of your essay will not get the attention it deserves.Write several introductory sentences, one for each specific strategy. Select the one most appropriate for the style and topic of your essay. Writing is never an exact science, and what works for one essay may be entirely wrong for the next. Whichever strategy you use, opt for something dramatic and specific. For example, "A lot of people use Kindle eReaders" would not be an effective opener. It states the obvious in a bland way. On the other hand, "Kindle eReaders threaten the historical primacy of the printed book" is far more dramatic and attention-grabbing.In a narrative, you have a theme or purpose that runs through your story. With a short story or novel, the theme is not stated directly. Instead, your characters, setting and plot help develop the theme throughout the story. When you begin a narrative essay, you should know the purpose of your story and create a thesis statement in the first paragraph. Typically, you place your thesis as the last or next to last sentence in the introduction.